Guest Blog // What’s Your Sutori? Interactive Study Guides and Active Note-Taking

This year, I have been experimenting with an online resource called Sutori for my art history survey courses. The program (formerly called HSTRY and rebranded as Sutori in 2016) is intended to tell stories in an interactive way. Their website used to read, “Stories amaze, stories teach. Stories connect, stories touch. Sutori is the perfect place to share any story.” Couldn’t we all say the same thing about art? I have always likened art history to storytelling, so I gave it a try. The program (formerly called HSTRY and rebranded as Sutori in 2016) is intended to tell stories in an interactive way. Their motto is “Stories amaze, stories teach. Stories connect, stories touch. Sutori is the perfect place to share any story.” I feel like we could all say the same about art! I originally started using Sutori for project-based assignments, like collaborative timelines and class dictionaries, but this post focuses on the way that Sutori can be used to create effective interactive study guides for students to use in and out of class. Beyond introducing the platform (which I see as extremely beneficial to introductory survey students or secondary school students), I reflect on how it can be used to teaching active note-taking at the survey level and how it can help create student-centered approaches to survey courses.

What’s Your Sutori? Interactive Study Guides and Active Note-Taking,” AHTR Weekly, Art History Teaching Resources (November 17, 2017)

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Christina M. Spiker | Guest Blog // What’s Your Sutori? Interactive Study Guides and Active Note-Taking
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