Christina M. Spiker

Christina M. Spiker

Art Historian | Professor | Digital Humanist

Public Lecture on Ainu Representation @ Macalester (9/19)

I couldn’t be more excited to be delivering a public lecture at Macalester College on September 19th. If you are interested in blending Art History, Asian Studies, and Indigenous Studies, I encourage you to come. My talk is titled “Indigenous Modernity in Hokkaido, Japan: the Complexities of Ainu Representation in Photography and Illustration” and is sponsored by the departments of Art and Art History, Asian Studies, and the Office of Academic Programs. The talk arises out of research completed for my dissertation and figures who I continue to grapple with. In addition to exploring the dominant images that forged the Ainu stereotype in the Euro-American imagination, I will be examining how Ainu producers of image and text—such as Takekuma Tokusaburō and Katahira Tomijirō—engaged with these dominant representations. I feel that understanding the gradual development of optical consistency from photographs to the illustrations based on them can better illuminate the calcification of Ainu stereotypes at home and abroad, as well as expand our understanding of photography as a visual medium in Meiji and Taishō Japan.

For those interested:

Title: “Indigenous Modernity in Hokkaido, Japan: the Complexities of Ainu Representation in Photography and Illustration”

Location: JBD Lecture Hall, Campus Center, Macalester College

Time: 6-7:30pm (talk followed by Q&A)

Threshold: Whispers of Fukushima @ St. Olaf (April 15, 6pm)

This Friday, director Toko Shiiki and composer Erik Santos will be screening and talking about their documentary Threshold: Whispers from Fukushima. If you are in the area, the event is free and open to public and will be followed by a Q&A and refreshments. Threshold is an award-winning documentary that examines the experience of several musicians from the Fukushima area after the earthquake, tsunami, and nuclear disasters of March 2011.

Date: 4/15/2016 (Friday)

Time: 6pm

Location: Tomson Hall 280, St. Olaf College

Official Blurb: Director Toko Shiiki focuses on the role of music as a positive and unifying force that supports a recovering community. She writes, “Finding and nurturing one’s happiness to continue living a healthy life is a fundamental human concern. No matter where we live, we must face this. The people in Fukushima have such inspiring sounds and stories to share with the world. From these positive people, perhaps we might learn and remember something important and unexpected.”

Whether you are in Asian Studies, Environmental Studies, Film, Music, or Art — I think the film will bring a lot of unique perspectives. Congratulations to Kendra Strand for all of her hard work organizing. Hope to see you there!

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